Legacy

by Satish Sekar © Satish Sekar (February 19th 2015)

Sepp Blatter’s Final Act

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Which is the most powerful office in the world? The office of the President of the United States. Wrong. The most powerful office in the world is the office of the President of FIFA. Right. Why? Because football is the most popular sport in the world and money – vast amounts of it – talks.

The FIFA President Joseph Sepp Blatter has thrown his hat into the ring for the 2015 FIFA Presidential election again despite his assurances that last time would be his swansong.

The only reason Blatter would disregard the consequences of setting aside his public declaration made on the eve of the last elections that he would not run for the office again, and dare to seek the office one more time is because he is confident he will win it. The early declared competitor Jérôme Champagne – eased or forced out FIFA five years ago has fallen by the wayside.

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UEFA have grumbled put its President Michel Platini refused to mount a challenge. David Ginola was never a credible challenger, so Blaterʼs confidence was not misplaced. It is simply the reality of the situation on ground. However, new contenders emerged. The first to declare was Jordanian Executive Committee member Prince Ali bin al-Hussein, followed by the President of the Dutch Federation Michael van Praag. Portuguese legend Luis Figo joined the race late, but has credibility. Blatter however remains confident. He knows that he has big support in Asian and African federations.

Unloved

Blatter knows that he will win not because the rest of the world loves him so dearly, or considers him indispensable, but because he seats atop the most powerful office on planet earth and will use the awesome power of that office (which he understands very well) and of his incumbency to check-mate all other contenders. Remember how he saw off the challenge of Mohammed bin Hammam. Where is the Qatari now?

Blatter and Hayatou 1

Americans donʼt talk about Chuck Blazer now, but that wasnʼt always the case. Blazer brought down bin Hammam and with him former CONCACAF leader Jack Warner – all of which suited Blatter. Bin Hammam was disgraced and thrown out of FIFA. He won that appeal after the damage was done and was brought down on new charges. Blazer faced his own troubles as Warner got even with his former protégé. Warner had to go as well. Not even the corruption charges laid against FIFA could shift Blatter. Even the report of Michael Garcia was so purged that the author disowned it! Not even that had any effect on Blatter.

Transparency and Integrity

He had served his apprenticeship and inherited the crown – he will not abdicate – even if his predecessor João Havelange had to sever his ties to FIFA after being implicated in a bribery scandal. He escaped prosecution partly due to his age. The former head of the Brazilian Federation Ricardo Teixeira was forced out after investigations in Brazil proved sufficient for criminal charges to be laid – a huge story that somehow vanished with barely a whimper.

Blatterʼs Argentinian ally Julio Grondona died soon after the World Cup. The corrupt former head of CONMEBOL Nicolás Leoz resigned ostensibly on health grounds. He too was named in corruption inquiries. One by one allies fell, but Blatter emerged unscathed. Even knowing of Havelangeʼs dubious activities made little difference. 

The product of such thinking is that even in the face of global rejection of fascism and totalitarianism as an acceptable system of governance, the world can do nothing about FIFA. President Blatter, at almost 80 years of age, four times already as President, knows that under normal ‘temperature and pressure’ he should not be seeking another term in office. 

Yet, but for the few ‘pretenders’ that have joined rather grudgingly the race, the world would be looking on hopelessly and helplessly, frustrated by the rules of engagement crafted in FIFA through the decades.

FIFA which holds football in trust for the entire world should be promoting best global practices in the promotion of global peace, friendship, equity, democracy, integrity, fair play and transparency. But here we are with a powerful office that bestows upon its occupier the perks and powers reminiscent of the darkest days of dictatorships in the world.

A Tarnished Legacy

It was not always so with Blatter. Given that Blatter has surely done a great deal more than any human alive for football in his four decades long romance with football, he should be the champion of the deepening of the tradition of true democratic practice that ensures that no office in the world today should have an unlimited term. FIFA runs a no-term limit for the office of its President. That should go.

Even the Presidency of the most powerful nation on earth, for good reason through past experiences, has a two-term limit. Anything longer than two terms in any office will breed dictatorship. The situation in FIFA has become a canker-worm trickling downwards through all levels of global football administration.

Local Football Councils, State and National Football Associations and Federations, and even the Confederations are taking a cue from the practice in FIFA, and self-perpetuation in office now has become the norm and dominates the administrative football landscape. Take CAF for example.

Trickle-down

Issa Hayatou has been President for almost 30 years. The rules have been changed several times through the decades to accommodate his self-succession plots. The last one was a rule that only members of the Executive Committee could contest for the CAF presidency. These are all members loyal to him because he helped them all to get there.

As his present tenure draws to an end, there are reports of moves already seeking another term in office for him, even though the present constitution of CAF forbids anyone above the age of 70 from holding the office. Hayatou is now 68. Using the awesome power of the President, the goal-posts are to be shifted and the age limit restriction will be removed to enable him to contest again, despite even his poor health.

Issa Hayatou 3

At National Federations level, from country to country, particularly in the Third World, attempts at self-perpetuation in office have become photocopies of the FIFA model. That’s why there is crisis when election times come. This practice must be stopped. For now, only Sepp Blatter can do it.

The statutes of FIFA and all its Confederations and Federations must be amended before he leaves office, so that a two-term limit for the Presidency of FIFA, as well as all its affiliate Federation and Confederation members, is introduced. This should be the Sepp Blatter’s final act and the legacy that he bequeaths to football and the world.

Blatter and Hayatou 6

Sepp Blatter and Issa Hayatou exchange pennants.

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