Up and Up

Editorʼs Note

We have covered many sports that do not receive the recognition that they should. Among them is womenʼs handball. The speed and agility and active time in the sport compares well to other sports, notably football. The Magazine will be relaunched shortly. We will resume our coverage of a sport that tests the legacy of Londonʼs Olympic Games. For that reason we republish some of our articles on the sport.

Derek Miller

by Satish Sekar © Satish Sekar (February 25th 2011)

Missed Opportunity

Lord [Sebastian] Coe boasts that he saw the Olympic football competition in 2004 in Athens. A young Lionel Messi was the star turn. Coe is responsible for ensuring that Londonʼs Olympics are not only successful, but leave a legacy.

The elite sports are of course important, but for every Usain Bolt there others who deserve accolades. Bolt, Mark Spitz, Michael Phelps, Al Oerter and Carl Lewis are just some of the great Olympians, but I remain convinced that the greatest ever is and always will be the fantastic Leonidas of Rhodes.1

Handball, especially the womenʼs game is the real test of the Olympicsʼ legacy credentials. It provides fast-moving action, tactical awareness, high scoring, defensive skill, dexterity, skill and control, passing awareness and shooting prowess. The officials are respected to the point that no campaigns are necessary. London 2012 is sadly a tragically wasted opportunity, as Britain lags way behind the rest of the world, especially Denmark.

The Quest

Three years ago I visited Denmark for the first time and was introduced to the pleasures of womenʼs handball. It soon won me over. Thereʼs no diving, waving imaginary cards, demanding that opponents are sent off or feigning injury – shirt-pulling and obstruction occurs, but you canʼt have everything.

Every second is played with intensity and sportsmanship, even though professional fouls occur. In short, itʼs everything a sport should be. Randers goal-minder Channa Masson came to Denmark to learn the game – sheʼs Brasilian. She was in the first wave of Brasilians to come to Denmark.

“Denmark has the best league in the world,” she told us exclusively, which is why she came here. Her club Randers sit proudly on top of the league, which bodes well for the play-offs.

Randers were rapidly eliminated from the Championʼs League, but look forward to the play-offs and a league title. Masson played a blinder against Odense HK tonight, providing a formidable last barrier. Randers won convincingly 37-20.

They were the better team, but Massonʼs goal-minding was as valuable as the shooting prowess of Camilla Dalby, who top-scored with seven and the penalty-taking calmness of Germanyʼs Nina Wörz, who modestly insisted that Dalby was the penalty-taker, despite a first-half hat-trick of penalties.

Advice

Masson advised British girls to come to Denmark and watch the best. It worked for her. Masson not only learned from top players; she became the best and pushes herself hard. Randers are sitting pretty at the top of the league and extended their lead at the expense of tonightʼs hosts HK Odense.

Masson remains an inspiration and not just in her country. She bemoans the lost opportunity of London 2012. It was an opportunity to develop handball in Britain and in the Olympic movement. London 2012 has missed its chance – a real pity – but 2016 offers another chance. It may be too late for her, but she is looking forward to Rioʼs Games and footballʼs World Cup too.

It may come too late for Masson to play, but it would require a brave person or a fool to bet against her beating the drum for handball in Rio de Janeiro and helping to develop handball in her country and elsewhere. Nevertheless she still hopes that Londonʼs Olympics gets the message in time.

1 For further information on the greatest ever Olympian, which we published in a previous issue of the magazine.

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